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Emu Dreaming tram celebrates SA’s Aboriginal cultures

CONNECT - Message from the Chief Executive

27 May 2021

Adelaide Metro’s Kardi Munaintya (Emu Dreaming) tram will operate over the next two months to celebrate and support National Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week.

The Kardi Munaintya tram started running this week and will remain in operation until Sunday 18 July, to mark both Reconciliation Week (27 May to 3 June) and NAIDOC Week (4-11 July).

The Kardi Munaintya tram design was created in 2010 as a living work of art by Kaurna/Ngarrindjeri landscape architect and visual artist Paul Herzich, and facilitated by the Department for Infrastructure and Transport.

The design recognises and celebrates the diversity of Aboriginal cultures in South Australia by acknowledging the main Aboriginal Nations that are located either fully or partly within the state of South Australia.

It features each tram stop illustrated as a circular meeting place symbol and kardi (emu) are shown moving across the Kaurna/Adelaide landscape.

The kardi is a significant totem of the Kaurna people. The colour of each kardi represents the main ochre colours that are used by Kaurna people.

National Reconciliation Week recognises both the 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision. It is a time to learn about and celebrate the histories, cultures and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and explore how each of us can contribute to achieving reconciliation in Australia.

This year’s theme for National Reconciliation Week is “More than a word. Reconciliation takes action”. For more information, visit https://www.reconciliation.org.au/national-reconciliation-week/

NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. NAIDOC is celebrated not only in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, but by Australians from all walks of life.

The 2021 NAIDOC Week theme is “Heal Country!” For more information, visit https://www.naidoc.org.au/

Kardi Munaintya tram